Beenteha,  was born in Esfahan, Iran.

Beenteha first foray into filmmaking was a short experimental piece entitled Cirque Shab (Night Circus), a

film that dealt with the place and role of women in Iranian society. During the making of this film, Beenteha

met the Iranian artist and scholar Iraj Anvar ( Click on Iraj Anvar to read more ),  with whom he collaborated

to produce two additional films.  The first was a short film entitled Naqqali Shemr & Daughter of Iran, in which

the ancient Iranian art of Naqqali (lit. storytelling) was used to versify and narrate a tale of rivalry between the

Persians and their long-time enemies, the Turanians. The second film was a documentary entitled

Intoxicating Rhymes & Sobering Wine, a portrayal of the legendary 11th Century Persian mathematician,

astronomer, and poet Omar Khayyam. Inspired by Khayyam’s poetry, Majeed composed eleven original tracks

of music, which were released on two CDs entitled Plugged into Khayyam; Volumes I & II.

Beenteha’s mixed-media, video, and photography works have been exhibited at various galleries around

the world, including the Whitebox, Leila Taghinia-Milani Heller, and Gershwin galleries in New York,

and the Other Gallery in Shanghai. Beenteha has also written plays, short stories, and poetry in English

and Persian in addition to an English language children book entitled Once Upon a Star. In recent years

beenteha has written and directed 3 animations that have been screened in festivals around the world.

Beenteha also writes and produces original music for  multimedia projects.

Moving back and forth between  Tehran and New York City, Beenteha’s photography work projects a

sharp contrast between traditional and modern realities that co-exist uneasily in modern day Iran.

Beenteha work often features Iranian women dressed in an iconic fashion that seems more sacred than

profane.

Beenteha draws from a wide range of influences, including pop-art, conceptual art, comics, advertising,

classic portraits and religious iconography. Beenteha poetic work is often dark in nature portraying pain,

dislocation and trauma.